Tag: Advice

Quebec is a wonderful section of the Great Trail to cycle. Most of the trails are made for it, and the bike infrastructure in cities is well done. The most iconic of these bike routes is the Route Verte which encompasses 5300km of bikes trails. Many of the GT sections in Quebec are part of […]

Prince Edward Island is the simplest section of the Great Trail to plan. It consists of a single trail: The Confederation Trail. The famous Confederation Bridge leads from the mainland to P.E.I. If you’re hiking or cycling, you’ll need to take the ferry.  This 449.46 km trail (ideal for walking or cycling) will take you […]

Nunavut contains less than 200 km of the Great Trail. The majority of that is the Itijjagiaq (Inuktitut for “over the land”) Trail which begins on the southern shore of Frobisher Bay. Rugged and unmarked, this trail is not for the inexperienced hiker. It is rough, rocky, and includes frigid stream crossings. You can do […]

So here is the grand overview of the Great Trail Planning Guide. I’ll be updating this post with links as each piece of the map is published. I’m going to generally work from East to West, hopping up to include the Territories when it seems appropriate.

I’ve been doing a lot of reading about the Great Trail lately, writing a piece for theTrek.co (will be up in a few weeks!). However, I have not found a lot of great resources for planning a hike. Where is the list of all the sections? What towns to they pass through? The Trans-Canada Trail […]

Wear Shoes That Fit (and Break Them In) It seems obvious, I know. But here is something to consider: At home I wear a size 6.5 shoes. My first pair of Altras on the PCT were size 7.0. My second pair were 7.5. Why? Because when you hike 10 to 15 to 20+ miles a […]

This week I am going to be talking about feet! There is lots to consider about taking care of your feet, so I have a whole week of posts including gears reviews and advice. The schedule is below, and I’ll update this page with links to each post as they are completed. Monday       […]

Training a puppy is a lot of work, but think of it as an investment. Put the time and work in the first year of your puppy’s life, and you will reap the rewards manyfold over the rest of their life. Training doesn’t end at one year, but having a solid foundation and a strong relationship will make lifelong learning so much easier.